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Professional Group

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Blue Teens Fix


The program's centerpiece is the downloadable DoSomething Vibe Check Guide, which equips teens with the tools to have meaningful conversations about mental health with their peers and their communities. The guide includes tips for active listening, conversation starters, and resources. "The guide is awesome, from the design, colors, and how it's written with teens in mind, without adults trying to use teenage jargon. I thought it was very respectful of teenagers and their intelligence level," said Maya Gomez, a senior at Whitney High School near Sacramento and mental health advocate.




blue teens



The Vibe Check Guide provides a curated list of websites and phone numbers teens can contact for emergency and non-emergency help. The guide also shares tips on how to build a support system through communications (both sharing and listening):


See the demo here! The testing area turns purple when exposed to the blue light flashlight. It is easy to see how well our blue light blocking glasses block out the blue light.You can rest assured that while your teens are playing on their tablets or computers, you won't have to worry about blue light like this getting through.


Light from electronic screens comes in all colors, but the blues are the worst. Blue light fools the brain into thinking it's daytime. When that happens, the body stops releasing a sleep hormone called melatonin. Melatonin is nature's way of helping us wind down and prepare for bed. The body starts releasing it a couple of hours before bedtime. Darkness helps trigger the release of melatonin; blue light delays it.


The majority of teenagers bring some kind of technology into the bedroom, adding to the amount of screen time they get each day and affecting multiple areas of their lives. Experts are becoming increasingly concerned about the effects of blue light from these electronic devices on the sleep-wake cycle. An estimated 2 in 3 teenagers regularly sleep less than the recommended amount, and screen time may be responsible for sleep deprivation and other problems.


Smartphones, tablets, computers, television screens, and some e-readers give off short-wavelength blue light that is very similar to sunlight. Not only does this light make people more alert, it also deceives the body into thinking it is still daytime.


Screen time is linked to a host of insomnia symptoms in teenagers. By delaying the release of melatonin, screen time lengthens the time it takes to fall asleep and leads to less restful sleep overall. As the majority of teens have strict school start times, a later bedtime typically results in fragmented sleep and increased next-day sleepiness. Over time, consistently late weekday bedtimes and catch-up sleep on the weekend disrupt the circadian rhythm.


Scientists believe that children and adolescents may be extra sensitive to the effects of blue light because their eyes let more light in Trusted Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. View Source . For this reason, limiting evening screen time for children and adolescents is especially important to prevent sleep problems.


In addition to suppressing melatonin levels, screen time for teens may directly reduce sleep time. Engaging in exciting content before bedtime or using social media Trusted Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. View Source can boost alertness and impede sleepiness. Alertness and melatonin levels can also be affected by passive technology, such as a television running in the background or a smartphone that emits sounds, vibrations, and light.


There is some debate about if screen time actually causes insomnia in teens, or if teens who have trouble sleeping are more likely to use screens at night. To make matters more complicated, excessive mobile phone use has been linked to symptoms of depression and anxiety Trusted Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. View Source , which are additional risk factors for insomnia. It may be that sleep, screen time, and negative emotions interact to exacerbate unhealthy behaviors.


The prevailing opinion among health experts is that screen time has a greater effect on insomnia than vice-versa. Studies show that 57% of teens Trusted Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. View Source who use technology in the bedroom suffer from sleep problems, and teens consistently report worse sleep when they have a television or small screen Trusted Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. View Source , such as a smartphone, in the bedroom.


Some experts believe that sleep is hindered more with devices that require interactive use, such as a smartphone or a video game console. Others suggest that smartphones might impact melatonin levels more than television screens since they tend to be held nearer to the face. Along the same lines, sleep appears to suffer more when teenagers use screens in a dark room Trusted Source National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. View Source , possibly because their pupils are more dilated and let more blue light pass through.


The more time a teenager spends on a screen each day, the more likely they are to have disturbed sleep Trusted Source National Center for Biotechnology Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. View Source . Also, using a phone to communicate with others near bedtime could lead to less sleep as teens stay up later to wait for a reply. Finally, keeping a phone unsilenced overnight is also shown to disturb sleep, as alerts for incoming messages may wake teens.


Because teenagers need to use screens for academic and social obligations, medical professionals prefer not to put an exact number on the recommended screen time for teens. Instead, they urge parents to develop a personalized family media protocol.


Children are especially at risk when it comes to the dangerous effects of blue light exposure. Their eyes are still developing and they don't yet have the protective pigments in their eyes to help block some of this harmful blue light. Eye doctors reported 38% increase in effects from blue light exposure in kids and 54% of parents express worry about their kid's vision due to increased digital device use according to a study published in 2014. Mind Bridge computer glasses video gaming glasses were designed specifically to protect developing eyes against harmful blue light and UV. Our little-to-no tint lenses offer high protection and high transmittance needed for young eyes. Tests show Mind Bridge children glasses can effectively block 70% of the harmful blue light (wavelength 400440 nm) and provide 77% high transmittance of beneficial blue light (wavelength 440500 nm).


The founders realized that they could help teens feel a little less alone through text messages, so they decided to turn it into a product. McAnany and Tracy pivoted from their idea of creating a media content service to building their own technology to support teen girls, which is how Blue Fever was born.


Moran and four friends, all students at Franklin High School, were swimming Friday about 20 yards upriver from the dam when 16-year-old Sarah McLevish of Morgantown got swept over into the turbulent "boil" below the concrete structure, authorities said. Moran and three other teens all swam over the dam to rescue her.


The Wall Street Journal reported over the weekend American teens may be feeling just that while messaging friends and family in their social circle. Maybe you've felt it, too, texting blue bubbles back and forth and then, suddenly, green. Maybe you've said, "ugh, green," too.


That reaction is nothing out of the ordinary for many of the teens and college-aged students who spoke with the outlet. Others said they've been singled out and considered totally unworthy after switching from Apple's iPhone to the Android competition.


Not wanting to feel left out, young Americans have made iMessage and its blue texts a status symbol of sorts and helped drive Phone market share to an estimated 74 percent among people aged 18-24, according to the WSJ.


Malden teens were in for a treat over February break. The Malden Teen Enrichment Center (MTEC) took 19 teens on a three-day excursion out to Cardigan Lodge in Alexandria, New Hampshire. MTEC announced in January to teens that they were going to be having a winter trip, bringing teens to Cardigan Lodge, and handing out permission slips to teens who showed interest in the trip.


The Malden Teen Enrichment Center has done many trips before, bringing teens camping in the summer and hiking during the spring. MTEC is able to provide teens the opportunity to go on trips like these through their ties with the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) which helps provide them with training and outdoor gear for use on the trips they go on. 041b061a72


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